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Can rabbits eat Parsley?

If your rabbit is acting abnormally and you have concerns please take them to a vet immediately.

Can rabbits eat parsley?

Parsley is an absolute favorite for our rabbit Link, dark leafy greens are crucial to keeping your rabbit’s diet balanced. Ideally, you will want varying types of roughage in the form of greens, hay & fruit. Unfortunately, adding the wrong foods to your rabbit’s diet could cause big problems, so, that begs the question, is Parsley safe for rabbits to eat?

Parsley is incredibly rich in antioxidants and Vitamins A & K, additionally, it smells wonderful!

Can rabbits eat parsley? – The answer is yes, rabbits can eat Parsley. Not only can they eat Parsley but it’s a great addition to their diet with limited to almost no downsides making it something you should add to your rabbit’s dietary plan.

Is Parsley safe for rabbits to eat?

What diet should my rabbit have

The only downside to Parsley is overfeeding, in larger quantities Parsley can lead to an excess of vitamin and mineral count which can lead to organ damage and potential GI Stasis due to your rabbit’s sensitive stomach.

If your rabbit is eating mostly hay (At least 80%), your rabbit shouldn’t have any issues. However, this does vary from rabbit to rabbit, you may find that some rabbits are extremely sensitive to Parsley as such you will want to insert Parsley into their diet slowly.

How much parsley can rabbits eat?

Parsley is an extremely healthy option for the rabbits greens section of your rabbits diet. In terms of the quantity, it’s all about portion control, if you’ve only recently just started introducing Parsley into your rabbits diet you should introduce this slowly by giving only a small bundle a day at most.

You should only give your rabbit Parsley 2-3 times a week at most, mix this up with other dark leafy greens and vegetables.

If your rabbit gets GI Stasis and their diet hasn’t changed outside the Parsley, it may be worth cutting down the quantity or removing it entirely from their diet.

Health Benefits of Parsley

Luckily, Parsley is absolutely packed with moisture, nutrients & vitamins. It’s considered to be helpful in preventing both heart disease & cancer. This is due to Parsley containing folic acid which has been found to help prevent both colon and cervical cancer (Source).

Whilst this isn’t specific to rabbits, you can’t deny the research showing how good these are for animals & creatures on the planet.

Can Parsley be bad for rabbits?

The only downside to parsley is overfeeding your rabbit which can impact their Gastrointestinal Tract. This is due to your rabbits sensitive insides, if you’ve had a rabbit for a while you’ll know that one wrong turn can lead to a trip to the vets!

How to feed Parsley to your rabbit

Luckily due to how healthy Parsley is, you can give your rabbit the stems and the bushy part which is easily chewed and eaten. If your rabbit has issues eating or needs assistance, you can chop up the parsley leaves into smaller parts which should help with digestion and avoid potential choking hazards.

Additionally if your rabbit has a sensitive gut, running the Parsley through with water should remove any additional bacteria or pesticides.

When giving your rabbit Parsley, make sure they are fresh and stored in the fridge if not consumed.

What are the nutritional benefits of Parsley for Rabbits?

Parsley contains high amounts of Vitamin A & Vitamin K along with Folic Acid & Iron. This makes Parsley an amazing choice to add to any rabbits greens diet.

NutritionValue
Fat0.5g
Sodium34mg
Dietary Fiber2g
Sugar0.5g
Protein1.8g
Vitamin D0mcg
Calcium83mg
Iron3.7mg
Potassium332mg
Per 60g (Source)


Thank you for reading this post!
Link is an incredibly spoilt rabbit who lives completely free roam. When he's not jumping on his owners heads at 5am or digging at carpet he can often be seen loafed or eating copious amounts of hay.